Chat with us, powered by LiveChat What key points or themes were raised in the assigned readings? One paragraph in length. Details and analysis of assigned article one with page citations, two paragraphs. Details and - Wridemy Bestessaypapers

What key points or themes were raised in the assigned readings? One paragraph in length. Details and analysis of assigned article one with page citations, two paragraphs. Details and

 organization— use the following paragraphs:

  1. Introduction. What key points or themes were raised in the assigned readings? One paragraph in length.
  2. Details and analysis of assigned article one with page citations, two paragraphs.
  3. Details and analysis of article two with page citations, two paragraphs.
  4. Conclusion. Summarize key points and provide details from the assigned video clip, how does it connect to readings? Here is what I learned from reading these articles.
  5. Why is this information important?
  6. Was any of the information new to you, has it made you think differently, etc.? One paragraph in length.

Take a look at the example attached below!!

Use this article for 2 & 3
The World In Faces | United Nations

Chapter 1 is attached below for question 1

Videos for question 4
The Indigenous world view vs. Western world view – YouTube 

Colonialism – YouTube 

*Note— This sample is provided to give an idea of essay content. This sample is not formatted

in APA style.

Analysis Essay

Photography: Misrepresentation

Art and photography play an important role in the depiction and imagery of Native Americans.

Portraits of Native Americans have been done in such a way that inaccurately depicts their

people, history, and traditions. Our modern world has been socialized in a manner that

underplays the importance of these inaccurate representations. The imagery of Native

Americans has been used for advertising, in company logos, as well as many other aspects of

media. By doing so, it misrepresents Native Americans and underplays the importance of their

history and traditions. It strips them of their humanity as well as identity. The article “A "Real"

American Indian” written by Huyser, Kimberly R. discusses the power held by stereotypes and

self-images in the modern images of Native Americans. Specifically, the article focuses on

Huyser, Kimberly R. and her participation in a project which aims to create images of Native

Americans in the modern era. The depiction of Native Americans has been an issue dated back

to the era of colonization. Their depiction was controlled by media and individuals in power in

order to paint a certain narrative. The author was shocked to her portray was next to and

compared with another of a Native woman in traditional regalia. These portraits of Native

Americans were portrayed with a rigid expression and a dark and almost olive complexion. For

Huyser, when she envisions the American Indian it, “evokes one of three representations: a

black and white image of a stoic American Indian, Tonto from the Lone Ranger, or the

Washington Redskins mascot” (Huyser, 70). When thinking of Native Americans, these are the

images that pop up in one’s mind. These depictions of Native Americans were controlled by the

media and those in power in order to perpetuate a certain narrative. This is why these

depictions are known as “controlling images”. They are powerful stereotypes that aim to attack a

group’s humanity and identity. On top of this, it also has a great effect on the member’s self-

value. These “controlling images” of indigenous people control the narrative and the image that

the public may have of Native Americans. It also limits the understanding and representations of

these Indigenous peoples. During a visit to various elementary schools during Native American

month, Huyser recalls her experiences. “I typically arrive in my usual clothes, and students often

ask why I don't ‘look like an Indian’, what my ‘Indian name’ is. They excitedly show me the

‘Indian clothes’ they made out of brown t-shirts that had been shredded and decorated with a

black marker” (Huyser, 70).These types of classroom projects are fun for students to partake in.

However, they may

not necessarily convey the correct depiction of American Indians. They are fun in part because

they are disconnected from the history of wars, genocide, murder, forced assimilation, and the

continual colonialism of Native Americans. Huyser suggests that teachers not shy away from

the discussion of certain contemporary and current social issues. One of which includes why

certain states are choosing to forgo Columbus Dayan instead adopt Indigenous People’s Day.

This type of discussion will move students away from the stereotypical depiction of Native

Americans allowing them to forgo their socialized ideas and imagery. The article Presence,

Significance and Insistence: Photographs in place by Devorah Romanek discusses the method

of redeploying historic ethnographic images of Native Americans in New Mexico in order to help

investigate the roles that photograph shave on the image and depiction of Native Americans.

The photographs will be deployed in the American Southwest, in the areas in which contentious

clashes concerning identity occurs. Specifically, the article will focus on factors of photography

including presence, presence in absence, punctum, or inalienable and unredeemable aspects. It

is known that, when it comes to Native American photography, the Library of Congress often

record inaccurate identities of the photographer, the date, and in certain cases the name of the

individuals being photographs. One of the factors which prevents from seeing this inaccuracy is

the literal representation in the photograph. When layered with original intentions and

conventions and perpetuated by accretion of meaning, the literal representation creates a

distance between the audience and the image. One of the methods deployed was a short video

accessed via QR code installations in Santa Fe, Mexico. by Will Wilson, a citizen of the Navajo

Nation, trans-customary Diné (Navajo) artist. The video was accessed by scanning a QR code

that was temporarily attached to the monument with masking tape. The video and QR code

installation speaks to the idea that in New Mexico, there exists a struggle between Indigenous

identified people and their own identity and history. On top of this, “being an intellectually

informed work of self-identification, social appropriateness or social justice, Wilson’s QR code

piece expresses a felt sense of history, and an embodied knowing of what is wrought by

creating such works and taking such actions in the present” (Romanek, 275). It follows the idea

that by moving forward, we only stay where we are currently. However, by taking control of what

has been forgotten and by allowing the past to influence us, we will start moving forward. The

future is important but we must understand the past in order to reach it. Learn from the mistakes

of the past so that it is not repeated in the future. The acts of invention within photography by

Native American artists are not just in defiance in the struggle for ownership of their image. It is

attuning to how these images may help and support the cause of their historical presence and

character. These artists have invents new meaning out of the historical presence in old

photographs.

,

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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the inconvenient indian

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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Other Books by Thomas King Published by the University of Minnesota Press

One Good Story, That One: Stories A Short History of Indians in Canada: Stories The Truth About Stories: A Native Narrative

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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The

INCONVENIENT INDIAN A Curious Account of Native

People in North America

Thomas King

University of Minnesota Press Minneapolis

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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Originally published in 2012 by Doubleday Canada First published in 2013 in the United States by the University of Minnesota Press

Copyright 2012 Dead Dog Café Productions, Inc.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Published by the University of Minnesota Press 111 Third Avenue South, Suite 290 Minneapolis, MN 55401-2520 http://www.upress.umn.edu

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data King, Thomas, The inconvenient Indian : a curious account of native people in North America / Thomas King. Includes index. ISBN 978-0-8166-8976-7 (hc) ISBN 978-1-5179-0446-3 (pb) 1. Indians of North America—History. 2. Indians of North America—Social life and customs. 3. Indians, Treatment of—North America. 4. North America—Ethnic relations. I. Title. E77.K566 2013 970.004'97—dc23

2013027013

Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper

The University of Minnesota is an equal-opportunity educator and employer.

23 22 21 20 19 18 17 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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For the grandchildren I will not see

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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CONTeNTs

Prologue: Warm Toast and Porcupines | ix

1. Forget Columbus | 1

2. The End of the Trail | 21

3. Too Heavy to Lift | 53

4. One Name to Rule Them All | 77

5. We Are Sorry | 99

6. Like Cowboys and Indians | 127

7. Forget about It | 159

8. What Indians Want | 193

9. As Long as the Grass Is Green | 215

10. Happy Ever After | 249

Acknowledgments | 267 Index | 271

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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PROLOGUe

WARM TOAST AND PORCUPINES

I am the Indian

And the burden

Lies yet with me.

—Rita Joe, Poems of Rita Joe

About fifteen years back,� a bunch of us got together to form a drum group. John Samosi, one of our lead singers, suggested we call ourselves “The Pesky Redskins.” Since we couldn’t sing all that well, John argued, we needed a name that would make people smile and encourage them to overlook our musical deficiencies.

We eventually settled on the Waa-Chi-Waasa Singers, which was a more stately name. Sandy Benson came up with it, and as I remember, waa-chi-waasa is Ojibway for “far away.” Appropriate enough, since most of the boys who sit around the drum here in Guelph, Ontario, come from somewhere other than here. John’s

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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T h e I n c o n v e n i e n t I n d i a n

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from Saskatoon. Sandy calls Rama home. Harold Rice was raised on the coast of British Columbia. Mike Duke’s home community is near London, Ontario. James Gordon is originally from Toronto. I hail from California’s central valley, while my son Benjamin was born in Lethbridge, Alberta, and was dragged around North America with his older brother and younger sister. I don’t know where he considers home to be.

Anishinaabe, Métis, Coastal Salish, Cree, Cherokee. We have nothing much in common. We’re all Aboriginal and we have the drum. That’s about it.

I had forgotten about “Pesky Redskins” but it must have been kicking around in my brain because, when I went looking for a title for this book, something with a bit of irony to it, there it was.

Pesky Redskins: A Curious History of Indians in North America. Problem was, no one else liked the title. Several people I trust

told me that Pesky Redskins sounded too flip and, in the end, I had to agree. Native people haven’t been so much pesky as we’ve been . . . inconvenient.

So I changed the title to The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious History of Native People in North America, at which point my partner, Helen Hoy, who teaches English at the University of Guelph, weighed in, cautioning that “history” might be too grand a word for what I was attempting. Benjamin, who is finishing a Ph.D. in History at Stanford, agreed with his mother and pointed out that if I was going to call the book a history, I would be obliged to pay atten- tion to the demands of scholarship and work within an organized and clearly delineated chronology.

Now, it’s not that I think such things as chronologies are a bad idea, but I’m somewhat attached to the Ezra Pound School of

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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History. While not subscribing to his political beliefs, I do agree with Pound that “We do NOT know the past in chronological sequence. It may be convenient to lay it out anesthetized on the table with dates pasted on here and there, but what we know we know by ripples and spirals eddying out from us and from our own time.”

There’s nothing like a good quotation to help a body escape an onerous task.

So I tweaked the title one more time, swapped the word “history” for “account,” and settled on The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America. Mind you, there is a great deal in The Inconvenient Indian that is history. I’m just not the historian you had in mind. While it might not show immedi- ately, I have a great deal of respect for the discipline of history. I studied history as part of my doctoral work in English and American Studies at the University of Utah. I even worked at the American West Center on that campus when Floyd O’Neil and S. Lyman Tyler ran the show, and, over the years, I’ve met and talked with other historians such as Brian Dippie, Richard White, Patricia Limerick, Jean O’Brien, Vine Deloria Jr., Francis Paul Prucha, David Edmunds, Olive Dickason, Jace Weaver, Donald Smith, Alvin Josephy, Ken Coates, and Arrel Morgan Gibson, and we’ve had some very stimulating conversations about . . . history. And in consideration of those conversations and the respect that I have for history, I’ve salted my narrative with those things we call facts, even though we should know by now that facts will not save us.

Truth be known, I prefer fiction. I dislike the way facts try to thrust themselves upon me. I’d rather make up my own world. Fictions are less unruly than histories. The beginnings are more

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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engaging, the characters more cooperative, the endings more in line with expectations of morality and justice. This is not to imply that fiction is exciting and that history is boring. Historical nar- ratives can be as enchanting as a Stephen Leacock satire or as terrifying as a Stephen King thriller.

Still, for me at least, writing a novel is buttering warm toast, while writing a history is herding porcupines with your elbows.

As a result, although The Inconvenient Indian is fraught with his- tory, the underlying narrative is a series of conversations and argu- ments that I’ve been having with myself and others for most of my adult life, and if there is any methodology in my approach to the subject, it draws more on storytelling techniques than historiog- raphy. A good historian would have tried to keep biases under control. A good historian would have tried to keep personal anec- dotes in check. A good historian would have provided footnotes.

I have not. And, while I’m making excuses, I suppose I should also apolo-

gize if my views cause anyone undue distress. But I hope we can agree that any discussion of Indians in North America is likely to conjure up a certain amount of rage. And sorrow. Along with moments of irony and humor.

When I was a kid, Indians were Indians. Sometimes Indians were Mohawks or Cherokees or Crees or Blackfoot or Tlingits or Seminoles. But mostly they were Indians. Columbus gets blamed for the term, but he wasn’t being malicious. He was looking for India and thought he had found it. He was mistaken, of course, and as time went on, various folks and institutions tried to make the matter right. Indians became Amerindians and Aboriginals and Indigenous People and American Indians. Lately, Indians have

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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become First Nations in Canada and Native Americans in the United States, but the fact of the matter is that there has never been a good collective noun because there never was a collective to begin with.

I’m not going to try to argue for a single word. I don’t see that one term is much better or worse than another. “First Nations” is the current term of choice in Canada, while “Native Americans” is the fashionable preference in the United States. I’m fond of both of these terms, but, for all its faults and problems—especially in Canada—“Indian,” as a general designation, remains for me, at least, the North American default.

Since I’m on the subject of terminology and names, I should mention the Métis. The Métis are one of Canada’s three official Aboriginal groups, Indians (First Nations) and the Inuit being the other two. The Métis are mixed-bloods, Indian and English, Indian and French, for the most part. They don’t have Status under the Indian Act, but they do have designated settlements and homelands in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Many of these communities maintain a separate culture from their White and First Nations neighbors, as well as a separate language—Michif—which features components of French and Aboriginal languages.

Terminology is always a rascal. I’ve tried to use “reservations” for Native communities in the United States and “reserves” for Native communities in Canada, and “tribes” for Native groups in the United States and “bands” for Native groups in Canada. But in a number of instances, when I’m talking about both sides of the border, I might use “reservation” or “reserve” and “band” or “tribe” or “Nation,” depending on rhythm and syntax. I actually

King, Thomas. The Inconvenient Indian : A Curious Account of Native People in North America, University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cudenver/detail.action?docID=1418416. Created from cudenver on 2023-01-23 21:07:49.

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prefer “Nation” or a specific band or tribal name, and I try to use this whenever possible.

And Whites. Well, I struggled with this one. A Japanese friend of mine likes to call Anglos “crazy Caucasoids,” while another friend told me that if I was going to use the term “Indians” I should call everyone else “cowboys.” Both of these possibilities are fun, but there are limits to satire. Besides, “Whites” is a per- fectly serviceable term. Native people have been using it for years, sometimes as a description and sometimes as something else. Let’s agree that within the confines of this book the term is neutral and refers to a general group of people as diverse and indefinab

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