Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Describe 3-4 deliverables produced from the execution of your project. Explain how project baselines are established and why they are important to EVM calculations. Not - Wridemy Bestessaypapers

Describe 3-4 deliverables produced from the execution of your project. Explain how project baselines are established and why they are important to EVM calculations. Not

 You will only have one opportunity to submit this assignment 4 as resubmissions for a better grade will not be allowed due to the end of the term.This is the final of three assignments. (This assignment should ONLY have the questions and answers for THESE questions – remove any answers from previous assignments)At this point, most communication issues have stabilized, and the execution process is producing deliverables. The sponsor, as well as the project team, are now focused on project performance and closure.InstructionsWrite a 3–4 page paper in which you address the following:

  1. Now that the project is in the execution process, summarize your project to date.
  2. Describe 3–4 deliverables produced from the execution of your project.
  3. Explain how project baselines are established and why they are important to EVM calculations.
    • Note: this relates to project control.
  •  Explain how you assess the results (what is good, what is bad) when you do EVM calculations. Provide examples using 3–5 EVM metrics.
    • Note: this relates to project control.
  •  Apply the PMBOK best practices to close your project.
    • Note: this relates to project closure.
  • List 3–5 lessons learned from your project. Provide examples.
  • Use at least four sources to support your writing. Choose sources that are credible, relevant, and appropriate. Cite each source listed on your source page at least one time within your assignment. For help with research, writing, and citations, access the library.

This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Be sure to include a cover page and Sources list. Note: the cover page and Sources list is not included in the 3–4 page count requirement. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. 

Chapter Fourteen

Project Closure

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Where We Are Now

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Learning Objectives

14-1 Identify different types of project closure.

14-2 Understand the challenges of closing out a project.

14-3 Explain the importance of a project audit.

14-4 Know how to use project retrospectives to obtain lessons learned.

14-5 Assess level of project management maturity.

14-6 Provide useful advice for conducting team performance reviews.

14-7 Provide useful advice for conducting performance reviews of project members.

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Chapter Outline

14.1 Types of Project Closure

14.2 Wrap-up Closure Activities

14.3 Project Audits

14.4 Project Audits: The Big Picture

14.5 Post-implementation Evaluation

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Project Closure and Review Deliverables

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14.1 Types of Project Closure

Normal

Premature

Perpetual

Failed project

Changed priority

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14.2 Wrap-up Closure Activities

Project closure usually includes the following six major activities.

Getting delivery acceptance from the customer.

Shutting down resources and releasing to new uses.

Reassigning project team members.

Closing accounts and seeing that all bills are paid.

Delivering the project to the customer.

Creating a final report.

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Wrap-up Closure Checklist

Task

Completed? Yes/No
Team
1 Has a schedule for reducing project staff been developed and accepted?
2 Has staff been released or notified of new assignments?
3 Have performance reviews for team members been conducted?
4 Has staff been offered outplacement services and career counseling activities?
Vendors/Contractors
5 Have performance reviews for all vendors been conducted?
6 Have project accounts been finalized and all billing closed?
Customer/Users
7 Has the customer signed off on the delivered product?
8 Have an in-depth project review and evaluation interview with the customer been conducted?
9 Have the users been interviewed to assess their satisfaction with the deliverables? With the project team? With vendors? With training? With support? With maintenance?
Equipment and Facilities
10 Have project resources been transferred to other projects?
11 Have rental or lease equipment agreements been closed out?
12 Has the date for the closure review been set and stakeholders notified?
Attach comments or links on any tasks you feel need explanation.

TABLE 14.1

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14.3 Project Audits

Use performance measures and forecast data.

Examine project success and review why the project was selected.

Include a reassessment of the project’s role in the organization’s priorities.

Include a check on the organizational culture to ensure it facilitates the type of project being implemented.

Can be performed while a project is in process or after a project is completed.

In-process project audits perform early in projects to allow for corrective changes and concentrate on project progress and performance.

Post-project audits include more detail and depth than in-process project audits and emphasize on improving the management of future projects.

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Guidelines for Conducting a Project Audit

The philosophy must be that the project audit is not a witch hunt.

Comments about individuals or groups participating in the project should be minimized.

Audit activities should be sensitive to human emotions and reactions.

The accuracy of data should be verifiable.

Senior management should announce support for the project audit.

The objective of project audits is not to prosecute but to learn and conserve valuable organizational resources where mistakes have been made.

The audit should be completed as quickly as is reasonable.

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The Project Audit Process

Step 1: Initiation and Staffing

Initiation of the audit process depends primarily on organization and project size.

The outcome must represent an independent, outside view of the project.

Step 2: Data Collection and Analysis

Information and data are gathered to answer questions from both organization view and project team view.

Step 3: Reporting

The report attempts to capture needed changes and lessons learned from a current or finished project.

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A Common Outline for Project Audit Reports

Classification

Project type

Size

Number of staff

Technology level

Strategic or support

2. Analysis

Scope objectives

Quality objectives

Cost objectives

Schedule objectives

Summary of risks

Outcomes achieved

3. Recommendations

Corrective actions

Technical improvements

Lessons learned

Reminders of mistakes

Retrospectives

5. Appendix

Backup data

Critical, pertinent information

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Project Retrospectives

Retrospectives denote specific efforts at identifying lessons learned on projects. An independent, trained facilitator acts as a guide who

Leads the project team through an analysis of project activities.

Uses several questionnaires focusing on project operations and on how the organization’s culture impacted project success or failure.

Visits one-on-one with project team members, the project manager, and other stakeholders to dive deeper into cause-effect impacts.

Leads a team retrospective session.

Works with the team to develop a system to prioritize information for different recipients.

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Project Process Review Questionnaire

Item Comments
1. Were the project objectives and strategic intent of the project clearly and explicitly communicated?
2. Were the objectives and strategy in alignment?
3. Were the stakeholders identified and included in the planning?
4. Were project resources adequate for this project?
5. Were people with the right skill sets assigned to this project?
6. Were time estimates reasonable and achievable?
7. Were the risks for the project appropriately identified and assessed before the project started?
8. Were the processes and practices appropriate for this type of project? Should projects of similar size and type use these systems? Why/why not?
9. Did outside contractors perform as expected? Explain.
10. Were communication methods appropriate and adequate among all stakeholders? Explain.
11. Is the customer satisfied with the project product?
12. Are the customers using the project deliverables as intended? Are they satisfied?
13. Were the project objectives met?
14. Are the stakeholders satisfied their strategic intents have been met?
15. Has the customer or sponsor accepted a formal statement that the terms of the project charter and scope have been met?
16. Were schedule, budget, and scope standards met?
17. Is there any one important area that needs to be reviewed and improved upon? Can you identify the cause?

TABLE 14.2

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Organizational Culture Review Questionnaire

Item Comments
1. Was the organizational culture supportive for this type of project?
2. Was senior management support adequate?
3. Were people with the right skills assigned to this project?
4. Did the project office help or hinder management of the project? Explain.
5. Did the team have access to organizational resources (people, funds, equipment)?
6. Was training for this project adequate? Explain.
7. Were lessons learned from earlier projects useful? Why? Where?
8. Did the project have a clear link to organizational objectives? Explain.
9. Was project staff properly reassigned?
10. Was the Human Resources Office helpful in finding new assignments? Comment.

TABLE 14.3

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14.4 Project Audits: The Big Picture

The purposes of all maturity models are to enable organizations to assess their progress in implementing the best practices in their industry and move to improvement.

A project maturity model yields a more encompassing look from an organization-wide point of view.

The latest version of the project maturity model developed by the Project Management Institute is called OPM3.

OPM3 is divided into a continuum of growth levels: Initial, Repeatable, Defined, Managed, and Optimized.

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Project Management Maturity Model

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14.5 Post-implementation Evaluation

The purpose of project evaluation is to assess how well the project team, team members, and project manager performed.

Evaluation implies measurement against specific criteria.

Team evaluation

Individual, team member, and project manager performance reviews

Individual reviews

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Team Evaluation

Tends to based on achieving project objectives according to time, cost, and specifications (scope) as well as customer/end user satisfaction.

Less common to assess how well the team worked together and with others.

Uses a survey administrated by a consultant, a staff member from the Human Resources Department or e-mail.

Uses the survey results to assess the development of the team, its strengths and weaknesses, and the lessons that can be applied to future project work.

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Sample Team Evaluation and Feedback Survey

Disagree Agree
Using the scale below, assess each statement.
The team shared a sense of common purpose, and each member was willing to work toward achieving project objectives. 1 2 3 4 5
Respect was shown for other points of view. Differences of opinion were encouraged and freely expressed. 1 2 3 4 5
All interaction among team members occurred in a comfortable, supportive atmosphere. 1 2 3 4 5

TABLE 14.4

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Individual, Team Member, and Project Manager Performance Review

Performance Assessment Responsibilities

Functional organization: the individual’s area manager

Balanced matrix: the project manager and the area manager jointly

Project matrix and project organizations: the project manager

Performance appraisals fulfill two important functions.

Development: the focus is on identifying individual strengths and weaknesses and developing action plans for improving performance.

Evaluation: the focus is on assessing how well a person has performed in order to determine salary or merit adjustments.

Multi-rater appraisal or 360-degree feedback involves soliciting feedback concerning team members’ performance from all the people their work affects.

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General Tips for Conducting Performance Reviews

Begin by asking the individual to evaluate his contributions to the project.

Avoid drawing comparisons with other team members; rather, assess the individual in terms of established standards and expectations.

Focus the criticism on specific examples of behavior rather than on the individual personally.

Be consistent and fair in treatment of all members.

Treat the review as only one point in an ongoing process.

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Key Terms

Lessons learned

Lessons learned repository

Performance review

Project closure

Project evaluation

Project maturity model

Retrospective

360-degree review

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Appendix 14.1

Project Closeout Checklist

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Project Closure Checklist

Item Status Comments/Plan to Resolve
1 Have all the product or service deliverables been accepted by the customer?
1.1 Are there contingencies or conditions related to the acceptance? If so, describe in the Comments.
2 Has the project been evaluated against each performance goal established in the project performance plan?
3 Has the actual cost of the project been tallied and compared to the approved cost baseline?
3.1 Have all approved changes to the cost baseline been identified and their impact on the project documented?
4 Have the actual milestone completion dates been compared to the approved schedule?
4.1 Have all approved changes to the schedule baseline been identified and their impact on the project documented?
5 Have all approved changes to the project scope been identified and their impact on the performance, cost, and schedule baselines documented?
6 Has operations management formally accepted responsibility for operating and maintaining the product(s) or service(s) delivered by the project?
6.1 Has the documentation relating to operation and maintenance of the product(s) or service(s) been delivered to, and accepted by, operations management?
6.2 Has training and knowledge transfer of the operations organization been completed?
6.3 Does the projected annual cost to operate and maintain the product(s) or service(s) differ from the estimate provided in the project proposal? If so, note and explain the difference in the Comments column.
7 Have the resources used by the project been transferred to other units within the organization?
8 Has the project documentation been archived or otherwise disposed of as described in the project plan?
9 Have the lessons learned been documented in accordance with the Commonwealth Project Management guideline?
10 Has the date for the post-implementation review been set?
10.1 Has the person or unit responsible for conducting the post-implementation review been identified?

APPENDIX 14.1

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End of Main Content

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No reproduction or further distribution permitted without the prior written consent of McGraw Hill.

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Accessibility Content: Text Alternatives for Images

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Project Closure and Review Deliverables – Text Alternative

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Project Closure Deliverables

Wrap-up closure activities

Facilities

Customer

Vendors

Report

Performance evaluation

Team evaluation

Individual evaluation

Project audit

Report

Retrospective

Lessons Learned

All three of these deliverables go to the project archives/database.

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Project Management Maturity Model – Text Alternative

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As time passes, project management passes through these five levels:

Level 1: Ad hoc project management

Level 2: Formal application of project management

Level 3: Institutionalization of project management

Level 4: Management of project management system

Level 5: Optimization of project management system

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